Monthly Archives: January 2015

“Select & Apply: Understanding How Users Act Upon Objects Across Devices” accepted at Personal and Ubiquitous Computing

Our paper was just accepted at the Personal and Ubiquitous Computing journal. As our interactions increasingly cut across diverse devices, we often encounter situations where we find information on one device but wish to use it on another device for instance a phone number spotted on a public display but wanted on a mobile. We conceptualise this problem as Select & Apply and contribute two user studies where we presented participants with eight different scenarios involving different device combinations, applications and data types. In the first, we used a think-aloud methodology to gain insights on how users currently accomplish such tasks and how they ideally would like to accomplish them. In the second, we conducted a focus group study to investigate which factors influence their actions. Results indicate shortcomings in present support for Select & Apply and contribute a better understanding of which factors affect cross-device interaction.

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A.L. Simeone, M.K. Chong, C. Sas, and H. Gellersen.
Select & Apply: Understanding How Users Act Upon Objects Across Devices
Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, vol. 19(5), Feb. 2015. Springer, 1-16.

PDF Version of Document

As our interactions increasingly cut across diverse devices, we often encounter situations where we find information on one device but wish to use it on another device for instance a phone number spotted on a public display but wanted on a mobile. We conceptualise this problem as Select Apply and contribute two user studies where we presented participants with eight different scenarios involving different device combinations, applications and data types. In the first, we used a think-aloud methodology to gain insights on how users currently accomplish such tasks and how they ideally would like to accomplish them. In the second, we conducted a focus group study to investigate which factors influence their actions. Results indicate shortcomings in present support for Select Apply and contribute a better understanding of which factors affect cross-device interaction.
@article{Simeone2015SelectApply
year={2015},
issn={1617-4909},
journal={Personal and Ubiquitous Computing},
doi={10.1007/s00779-015-0836-1},
title={Select & Apply: understanding how users act upon objects across devices},
url={http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00779-015-0836-1},
publisher={Springer London},
author={Simeone, Adalberto L. and Chong, Ming Ki and Sas, Corina and Gellersen, Hans},
pages={1-16},
language={English}
}

Preprint of CHI 2015 paper on Substitutional Reality now available

A preprint version of our recent paper on “Substitutional Reality” is now available. Additional video material will become available shortly.

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A.L. Simeone, E. Velloso, and H. Gellersen.
Substitutional Reality: Using the Physical Environment to Design Virtual Reality Experiences
In Proceedings of SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2015). ACM, pp. 3307-3316.

PDF Version of DocumentPresentation SlidesVideo

Experiencing Virtual Reality in domestic and other uncontrolled settings is challenging due to the presence of physical objects and furniture that are not usually defined in the Virtual Environment. To address this challenge, we explore the concept of Substitutional Reality in the context of Virtual Reality: a class of Virtual Environments where every physical object surrounding a user is paired, with some degree of discrepancy, to a virtual counterpart. We present a model of potential substitutions and validate it in two user studies. In the first study we investigated factors that affect participants' suspension of disbelief and ease of use. We systematically altered the virtual representation of a physical object and recorded responses from 20 participants. The second study investigated users' levels of engagement as the physical proxy for a virtual object varied. From the results, we derive a set of guidelines for the design of future Substitutional Reality experiences.
@inproceedings{Simeone2015SubstitutionalReality,
author={Simeone, Adalberto L. and Velloso, Eduardo and Gellersen, Hans},
title={Substitutional Reality: Using the Physical Environment to Design Virtual Reality Experiences},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 33rd annual ACM conference on Human factors in Computing Ssystems},
series = {CHI 2015},
year={2015},
pages = {3307--3316},
numpages = {10},
url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2702123.2702389},
doi = {10.1145/2702123.2702389},
publisher = {ACM}}

Paper on 3D indirect touch accepted at 3DUI 2015

Our paper titled “Comparing Indirect and Direct Touch in a Stereoscopic Interaction Task” has been accepted for inclusion in the 3DUI 2015 program.Task3

In this work we investigated the effect that occluding the screen has on direct touch 3D interaction techniques. Indeed, interacting with 3D content on a multi-touch screen causes the user to occlude with their arms or hands large parts of the display. We designed a 3D interaction task in which users had to move a biplane in a 3D environment while avoiding collisions with the gold spheres, which counted as errors. In one condition, participants interacted on a 3D multi-touch screen, in the other, we adapted the interaction technique for a tablet device. Results of our user-study showed that in the indirect condition (with the tablet) participants performed 30% less erros.

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A.L. Simeone and H. Gellersen.
Comparing Direct and Indirect Touch in a Stereoscopic Interaction Task
In Proceedings of 3D User Interfaces 2015 (3DUI 2015). IEEE, pp. 105-108.

PDF Version of Document

In this paper we studied the impact that the directedness of touch interaction has on a path following task performed on a stereoscopic display. The richness of direct touch interaction comes with the potential risk of occluding parts of the display area, in order to express one's interaction intent. In scenarios where attention to detail is of critical importance, such as browsing a 3D dataset or navigating a 3D environment, important details might be missed. We designed a user study in which participants were asked to move an object within a 3D environment while avoiding a set of static distractor objects. Participants used an indirect touch interaction technique on a tablet and a direct touch technique on the screen. Results of the study show that in the indirect touch condition, participants made 30\% less collisions with the distractor objects.
@inproceedings{Simeone2015Occlusion,
author={Simeone, Adalberto L. and Gellersen, Hans},
booktitle={3D User Interfaces 2015},
series = {3DUI 2015},
title={Comparing Direct and Indirect Touch in a Stereoscopic Interaction Task},
year={2015},
month={March},
}